How Many Years Does It Take For Wisteria To Flower To Deadhead Or Not to Deadhead – That is a Sticky Question

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To Deadhead Or Not to Deadhead – That is a Sticky Question

Okay, you have a flower garden. You want striking colors all summer long because you love the look of all those flowers gently swaying in the breeze. Your plants, on the other hand, are interested in growing and setting seed as quickly as possible so that they can perpetuate the species. Stop evolution by destroying your flower garden!

Deadheading removes wilted flowers from your annuals, but it also does so much more: removing extra stems and growth encourages new, vigorous growth and rebloom. It also opens up the plant for air circulation, reducing insect problems and moisture that can cause rot or viral infections. Help your flowers by cutting off those “split tips” when the flowers start to fade!

  1. Don’t wait to kill yourself, please. Why a flower garden if you don’t enjoy its beauty every day? If you have a job, go to your garden at least once a week to enjoy it and take care of it. If you wait to cut off spent flowers, your plants may not feel like blooming again, so your garden will not reach its full potential.
  2. Always use sharp, clean scissors or deadhead scissors. Some of us have sharp nails… some of us sometimes miss a clean cut with our nails. Your scissors should be sharp and rinsed after each use. Dry them thoroughly before putting them away.
  3. If only one flower has grown on you, just cut it off. Cut off! Done.
  4. If your plants bloom in clusters, cut off the entire faded cluster about one-third of the way from the root. In other words, if your snapdragons are trailing about 16 inches, cut off anything longer than 6 inches from the roots. If your daisies are 30 inches tall, cut them back to about 10 inches. And so on.
  5. Hairstyles are healthy! Your annuals appreciate losing that extra weight and will come back. Be patient as it takes a week or two, but your plants will reward you.
  6. Give your annuals a dose of nutrition (with a balanced fertilizer like Miracle-Gro) when you trim them.
  7. Head to the Goodwill store, invest 50 cents in a bud vase, and enjoy long-stemmed flowers before they wilt. One perfect daisy on the dining room table is beautiful. Place flowers with smaller or shorter stems in a regular glass bowl. It will last a few days – if you can keep the cats away from them!
  8. Pay attention to this tip: You have to get down deep into the plant, not just by plucking the flower. Reach inside and find the bottom of the flower stem, whether it’s a node, a branch, or even deeper towards the root. Cut off the spent bloom to make it bloom again faster.

You are unlikely to kill your plants by deadheading, although they may look fragile for a few days. Be careful until you gain experience. Late season deadheading just keeps your garden tidy and ready for winter…you won’t rebloom if it’s too late in your growing season.

For perennial growers, here are a few lists of plants that can benefit from deadheading or that don’t really need it. Most of these plants are perennials in Minnesota. Some perennials will rebloom…some won’t, but you should still nurture them as needed.

Plants that benefit from deadheading, pinching and reshaping

  • Astra
  • A bleeding heart
  • Buddleia (also known as Butterfly Bush)
  • Calendula (also known as calendula)
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Coleus
  • Coral bells
  • Coreopsis
  • Cosmos
  • daisies
  • Day lilies
  • Delphinium
  • Foxglove
  • Gaillardia (also known as blanket flower)
  • Hollyhock
  • Jacob’s ladder
  • Lavender
  • Lupine
  • Pansies
  • Petunias
  • Roses
  • sage
  • Snapdragons
  • Viola
  • zinnias

Plants that do not require removing the head, but will look more beautiful if you take care of them

  • Astilbe
  • Bee balm
  • bougainvillea
  • Clematis
  • Dianthus
  • Euryopsis
  • Fuchsia
  • Hibiscus
  • Hydrangea
  • Impatiens
  • Jasmine
  • Lantana
  • Lilac
  • Morning glory
  • Watercress
  • sage
  • Trumpet of Vine
  • Vervain
  • Vinch
  • Wisteria

I hope this article helps you take care of your flowers so you can get the most out of your gardening efforts.

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