Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate Has Global Warming Made Hurricane Damage Worse

You are searching about Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate, today we will share with you article about Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate is useful to you.

Has Global Warming Made Hurricane Damage Worse

Hurricanes are the most violent and destructive storms in nature. There is a smaller but potentially destructive storm raging between climate scientists and climate skeptics over the nature of hurricanes. Scientific evidence points to the fact that global warming is causing more intense hurricanes. Skeptics would like to convince everyone that global warming has not brought about any change in hurricanes, so there is no need to worry about global warming. The skeptics have a point or two, but not much. Skeptics want absolute proof from scientists, but that’s not how science works.

Skeptics say that the number of hurricanes in the South Atlantic is not increasing, and they are probably right. Hurricanes start out as tropical storms, which appear randomly depending on weather conditions. Skeptics also say the increasing economic damage caused by the hurricane is due to increased construction along the coast. This is partly true, but it is also true that damage from storm surges has increased due to sea level rise, a measurable consequence of global warming. Those who listen to the skeptics and build imprudently in floodplains will surely experience more damage from storm surges.

Global warming has made the oceans much warmer, even later in the year. The water temperature must be above 82°F for a tropical storm to develop into a hurricane, and the warmer the ocean, the more likely a hurricane will strengthen once it forms. Hurricanes are like a heat engine, driven by warm air rising from the ocean like a chimney effect. The greater the temperature difference between the ocean and the upper atmosphere, the faster the upward flow and the higher the wind speed.

A hurricane has an eye of low pressure at its center, and as air draws in, it rises and circles counter-clockwise around the area of ​​low pressure, getting faster and faster as it approaches the eye. Warm, moist air rising from the ocean creates cloud bands around the eye. As warm moist air produces rain, more heat is released, heating the air further and causing it to rise faster until it reaches the top of the storm. Arriving there, it became colder and drier. Cold, dry air then enters the eyes and between the cloud bands. Remember the bands of clouds that are spinning very quickly around the eye, spinning faster and faster as they spiral inward.

A hurricane is similar to a heat engine. It is powered by energy from the warm oceans and low temperatures of the atmosphere above the storm. Due to global warming, this temperature difference is greater. The upper atmosphere receives energy from the earth below. The increasing carbon dioxide between them acts as a blanket, causing the oceans to be warmer and the upper atmosphere to be cooler. As with all heat engines, the greater the temperature difference, the greater the engine’s power. As a hurricane passes, it leaves cooler oceans in its wake as it siphons energy from the oceans. Due to global warming, the heat goes deeper, there is a larger area of ​​warm water, and both factors add more heat to the hurricane and cause it to increase and intensify.

Water vapor pressure increases exponentially with temperature. In our warmer world, there is now 10 to 15% more water vapor in the bands of rain that move around the eye of a hurricane. When Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Houston, Houston was expected to receive more rainfall. But by a fluke, as Harvey stalled over Houston and continued to pull in warm moist air from the Gulf, more than 50 inches of rain fell.

Sea level rise has been measured to be about 30 inches along the Gulf Coast. Extreme rain combined with rising sea levels increased the storm surge and flooded much of low-lying Houston. The stopping of the storm was a fortuitous event, and the skeptics are right when they say it shouldn’t have happened, but it did. Taking into account storm intensity, wind damage, sea level rise and extreme rainfall, climatologists attribute about 30% of the damage in Houston to global warming.

Satellite images of Hurricane Irma hitting Florida were twice the size of Hurricane Andrew, which hit Florida in 1992. Andrew killed 65 people, destroyed 65,000 homes and caused $26 billion in damage. Andrew was the most destructive hurricane to ever hit Florida before, and Irma could have been much worse.

Florida was very fortunate to have Hurricane Irma, spreading from the entire peninsula, come up the west side of the peninsula. The western side of the peninsula experienced very few storm surges. Winds on Irma’s leading edge, circulating counterclockwise, blew ocean water away from the coast, leaving the ocean dry a few hundred yards away as it passed. The storm was so weakened that by the time the back of the storm made landfall, directing water toward the coast, the storm surge was only a few feet. If Irma had moved up the eastern side of Florida, the storm surge at the leading edge of the hurricane could have been as high as 15 feet, completely flooding much of Miami.

There he is. Global warming has increased ocean temperatures and increased the temperature difference between the ocean and the upper atmosphere, both factors that make hurricanes more intense. Warmer oceans put more moisture in the air, making hurricane-force rainfall heavier, and rising sea levels have increased the height of destructive storm surges. This fall there were five powerful hurricanes that formed in the South Atlantic, all of which made landfall and caused extensive damage. It could just be a coincidence, skeptics say, but it’s never happened before.

Video about Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate

You can see more content about Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate

If you have any questions about Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 2715
Views: 49224305

Search keywords Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate

Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate
way Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate
tutorial Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate
Explain The Effect That Pressure Changes Had On Flow Rate free
#Global #Warming #Hurricane #Damage #Worse

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Has-Global-Warming-Made-Hurricane-Damage-Worse&id=9858379

Related Posts