Does A Flower Pot Need A Hole In The Bottom Plant Containers – Ideas on the Best Containers For Beautiful Plant Displays

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Plant Containers – Ideas on the Best Containers For Beautiful Plant Displays

Here’s how to create pots of show-stopping blooms for your deck, patio and porch.

Plant containers can be made from things you would otherwise throw away and this activity therefore has the double appeal of creating an attractive floral display while going green at the same time!

I have found that planting in old ice buckets or flour or sugar containers or pots and pans or even old boots or children’s toys like prams and doll cradles produces an amazing effect. I love putting them in front of the house and seeing the number of adults and children who smile and comment to their friends as they walk by. The fun is in the search.

Sometimes the plant can be a little heavy and unstable, depending on the type of plant, but most of the time there is no problem. In fact, when I first started, I was disappointed to find that in the middle of the flowering season, the plants lost their vigor. A gardener friend soon told me not to fertilize. Potted plants will not thrive if you don’t fertilize them. If you find this job too time-consuming, there’s an easy way to do it: just mix slow-release fertilizer granules into the top layer of potting soil.

You can also create a beautiful tiered display of flow by placing additional plants in hanging pots or elevating pots to allow drainage on forms and tables. Just be sure to strategize your watering access for the higher hanging baskets or you’ll be straining your arms reaching for the water and quite possibly getting wet while doing it for a bargain price!

If you don’t have containers that you can recycle, any type of clay planter that has drainage holes in the bottom and “saucers” to prevent the soil from washing away will do just fine; choose a size that suits the area you plan to grow your display flowers in and the number of containers you have. My local garden center sells a 20 inch oval planter that is 6 1/2 inches tall from the bottom of the saucer and about 9 1/2 inches at the widest part. It holds four or five annuals or small plants or two larger ones, and takes up 2 gallons of soil. I have had excellent results growing plants this way.

Another tip is to arrange the plants in your basket at the garden center before purchasing. You might get strange looks from other customers, but why not? You will easily find out if a combination of leaf color/texture, growth habit and flowering will work together. Remember, if you can’t decide which container would suit your plant, experiment and don’t be afraid to try something original. Next year you can always transplant to a more desired style. I find that a wide and tall container can be placed as a contrast, with larger plants that will be the focus rather than the background.

In situations where my houseplants have clearly attracted the attention of some leaf nibblers, I isolate them in a plastic bag with pest tape overnight. That process usually works well for me.

By experimenting, you will learn how to garden intensively in small areas. Movable containers such as rally pots and tubs are so flexible that your display can look neat and tidy all year round.

In dark areas or near entrances, try using warm colors (reds and oranges). They attract attention and can be seen from a greater distance. When planting in exposed or public areas, heavy concrete tubs have the added benefit of discouraging anyone from “accidentally” walking off with your prized plants or containers. Concrete planters can be left outside over the winter in areas exposed to frost without harm, which is good because you probably won’t want to move them. Be careful with clay though, as one sharp and intense frost can cause many unglazed types to disintegrate within 3 months.

Wooden containers are also suitable. I don’t recommend wine or whiskey barrels because they are too shallow and fall apart the first time you transplant them. Traditional cottage style wooden planters are some of my favorites. Some garden centers sell faux lead pots and reclaimed granite planters, some offering a simple vintage rustic look and others with a sophisticated period style.

Planting flowers in containers immediately adds color and liveliness to your yard. They are great for adding color to an area of ​​the garden that ‘needs something’ and can be moved around while you entertain in a particular area.

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